CraftBoston Spring 2012

This weekend I visited the Craft Boston show for a little inspiration, and to see how furnituremakers at the show were displaying, see what the crowd at this show is like.  This show is not strictly furniture, but includes artists and makers in many different media: ceramics, metal, jewelry, fabrics, etc. The ‘theme’ of the show was Steampunk, something like Victorian revival (think Jules Verne) which was a subtle presence, not carried through to most of the exhibitors. I won’t say more about it, because I don’t really appreciate the appeal, or understand the concept.

For me, and the other makers I went with, the focus was primarily the wood furniture, and other interesting woodwork.  I’ll say up front, that I did not do a great job in documenting everything we looked at, or even getting the maker’s names on all of the pieces I did photograph (primarily in the student works). Such is life.

First, I wanted to share some of the shots of my favorite piece from the show, from Center for Furniture Craftsmanship (CFC) student Monica Raymond: Standing Desk, in quartersawn walnut, QS walnut veneer, and maple, with holly stringing. Inspired by architectural features from some European cathedrals (stained glass windows, buttresses, entry arch, etc.), this piece was remarkable for the details.  If some of the little things had not been added, like the groove detail around the edge of the top, the angled feature where the walnut meets the maple leg, the fine maple cock-bead beneath the front apron and drawer, one might notice they were lacking, rendering the piece less than remarkable.

QS walnut veneer

Picture 2 of 5

 

 

Here are the remainder of the shots I took, with as much info as I have for each in the caption. I’ve made a gallery of images, with as much information as I could recall or recorded. (NOTE: If one of these is your pieces, and would like to add attribution, or additional descriptions, let me know, I’d be happy to add it!)

 

 

 

You can also check out some of the other exhibitor’s works at their websites:

Sharon Mehrman

Duncan Gowdy

Paula Garabino

Mark Del Guidice

Dan Klein

Monica Raymond

 

Apologies if I missed your booth!

 

Mansfield Fine Furniture
16 Chestnut St MansfieldMA02048 USA 
 • 508-801-5651

About Nick Roulleau

Nick Roulleau is founder, craftsman, designer, joiner, finisher, floor-sweep and all of the other roles at Mansfield Fine Furniture. A woodworker for more than a decade, Nick started the company with the goal of filling the need for heirloom-quality furniture hand-made from premium woods. Every piece is designed to suit the customer's needs and desires, hand-picking each piece of wood, and built one piece at a time, using both modern and centuries-old traditional methods to yield furniture to last for generations.
  • http://flairwoodworks.wordpress.com/ Chris Wong

    Nick,

    I, too, like Standing Desk.  One interesting thing I noticed is that it stands on a thin platform.  Why?  I can see it serving several functions:  1. If the floor isn’t flat, the platform is shimmed to prevent rocking rather than the desk, which would be unsightly;
      2. The platform elevates its presence and class; and
      3. It accentuates the shadows.

    Thanks for sharing these works.

    Chris

    • http://mansfieldfinefurniture.com/ Nick Roulleau

      Chris, 

      While I’m no expert on exhibition, I can say that you’re probably right on #2 and #3. All of the pieces, at least in the CFC booth were on platforms as part of the ‘staging’ (how they present, including the lighting, etc.).  I think it’s not uncommon to exhibit with pieces put on a pedestal (in all senses of the phrase), to make them stand out from the ordinary.  #1 is less likely, these floors are smooth concrete, and are typically pretty flat, but in a pinch, you’re correct that the shim would look better hidden beneath the platform.  

    • Monicaraymond36

      Chris, the Stand-up Desk is my piece and I’m glad you like it. All of the floor pieces in our booth were displayed on what we call plinths (though I like the word “pedestal” better! – ha, ha), primarily to protect them from damage from people inadvertently kicking the feet, as well as to set them off visually. The other reasons you list are certainly advantages as well.
      Have a great day!
      Monica Raymond

      • http://flairwoodworks.wordpress.com/ Chris Wong

        Hi Monica,
        Thank you for the information.

        Chris